PAIN, NARCOTICS AND CHRONIC ILLNESSES

This is an important article from the National Institutes of Health describing how people with chronic illnesses (including our precious children) are treated with opioids instead of with individual, patient-centered treatment. There are some medications in the trial stage that are not narcotics and have the potential to help to ease their pain. I read another article this morning that said that there is some question as to whether opioids truly give that much relief. Alex was given opioids from the time he was a young boy that became stronger as the years went by. It is difficult for a mother to watch her son become addicted to these drugs, and then be hospitalized after he attempts to take himself off all of them on his own. One thing I would like to point out is that the article never mentioned children. There should be a panel made up of pediatricians to do a similar study.

Embargoed for Release: Monday, January 12, 2015, 5:15 p.m. EST

Panel cites need for individualized, patient-centered approach to treat and monitor chronic pain

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An independent panel convened by the National Institutes of Health concluded that individualized, patient-centered care is needed to treat and monitor the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain. To achieve this aim, the panel recommends more research and development around the evidence-based, multidisciplinary approaches needed to balance patient perspectives, desired outcomes, and safety.

“Persons living with chronic pain have often been grouped into a single category, and treatment approaches have been generalized with little evidence to support this practice,” said Dr. David B. Reuben, panel chair and professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. “Chronic pain spans a multitude of conditions, presents in different ways, and requires an individualized, multifaceted approach.”

Photo of independent panel
Back row, left to right: Takamaru Ashikaga, David C. Steffens, Christopher M. Callahan. Front row, left to right: David M. Murray, David B. Reuben, G. Anne Bogat, Anika A.H. Alvanzo, Victoria Ruffing.
Chronic pain is often treated with prescription opioids, but the panel noted widespread concern with this practice. Although some patients benefit from such treatment, there are no long-term studies on the effectiveness of opioids related to pain, function, or quality of life. There is not enough research on the long-term safety of opioid use. However, there are well-documented potential adverse outcomes, including substantial side effects (e.g., nausea, mental clouding, respiratory depression), physical dependence, and overdose—with approximately 17,000 opioid-related overdose deaths reported in 2011.

“Clearly, there are patients for whom opioids are the best treatment for their chronic pain. However, for others, there are likely to be more effective approaches,” stated Dr. Reuben. “The challenge is to identify the conditions for which opioid use is most appropriate, the alternatives for those who are unlikely to benefit from opioids, and the best approach to ensuring that every patient’s individual needs are met by a patient-centered health care system.”

The panel identified several barriers to implementing evidence-based, patient-centered care. For example, many clinicians do not have tools to assess patient measures of pain, quality of life, and adverse outcomes. Primary care practices often do not have access to multidisciplinary experts, such as pain management specialists. Insurance plans may not cover team-based, integrative approaches that promote comprehensive, holistic care. In addition, some plans do not offer effective non-opioid drugs as first-line treatment for chronic pain, thus limiting a clinician’s ability to explore other avenues of treatment. Once a health provider has made the decision to use opioids, there are insufficient data on drug characteristics, dosing strategies, or tapering to effectively guide clinical care.

“Chronic pain spans a multitude of conditions, presents in different ways, and requires an individualized, multifaceted approach.”

—Dr. David B. Reuben
Panel chair and professor of medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles

“We have inadequate knowledge about treating various types of pain and how to balance effectiveness with potential harms. We also have a dysfunctional health care delivery system that promotes the easiest rather than the best approach to addressing pain,” noted Dr. Reuben.

To address knowledge gaps, the panel cited a need for more research on pain, multidisciplinary pain interventions, the long-term effectiveness and safety of opioids, as well as optimal opioid management and risk mitigation strategies. However, because well-designed longitudinal studies can be large, expensive, and difficult for recruitment, the panel encouraged the development of new research design and analytic methods to answer important research and clinical questions.

The panel also recommended engaging electronic health record vendors and health systems to provide pain management decision support tools for clinicians. In addition, the panel advised the NIH and other federal agencies to sponsor more conferences to harmonize pain assessment and treatment guidelines to facilitate consistent clinical care for the treatment of chronic pain.

The panel will hold a press telebriefing on Friday, Jan. 16, at 3 p.m. EST to discuss its findings with members of the media. To participate, call 888-428-7458 (toll free for United States and Canada) or 862-255-5398 (toll for other international callers) and reference the NIH Pathways to Prevention program on The Role of Opioids in the Treatment of Chronic Pain. Audio playback will be available shortly after the conclusion of the telebriefing and can be accessed by calling 888-640-7743 (United States and Canada) or 754-333-7735 (other international callers) and entering replay code 114001.

To better understand the role of opioids in the treatment of chronic pain, the NIH Office of Disease Prevention (ODP) convened a Pathways to Prevention workshop on Sept. 29–30, 2014, to assess the available scientific evidence. The panel’s final report, which identifies future research and clinical priorities, incorporates the panel’s assessment of an evidence report, expert presentations, audience input, and public comments. The panel’s report, which is an independent report and not a policy statement of the NIH or the federal government, is now available at https://prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/pathways-to-prevention/workshops/opioids-chronic-pain/workshop-resources.

The workshop was co-sponsored by the NIH Pain Consortium, the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), and the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS). The evidence report was prepared by the Pacific Northwest Evidence-based Practice Center through the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality’s Evidence-based Practice Centers Program.

The seven-member panel included experts in the fields of gerontology, rheumatology, internal medicine, psychiatry, addiction medicine, nursing, health education, biostatistics, and epidemiology. Panel member biographies, an archived videocast of the workshop, and additional resources are available at https://prevention.nih.gov/programs-events/pathways-to-prevention/recent-workshop/opioids-chronic-pain. Interviews with panel members can be arranged by contacting Deborah Langer at 301-443-4569 or langerdh@od.nih.gov.

The ODP assesses, facilitates, and stimulates research in health promotion and disease prevention in collaboration with the NIH and other public and private partners, and disseminates the results of this research to improve public health. For more information about the ODP, visit http://prevention.nih.gov.

The NIH Pain Consortium was established to enhance pain research and promote collaboration among researchers across the many NIH Institutes and Centers that have programs and activities addressing pain.

NIDA’s mission is to lead the nation in bringing the power of science to bear on drug abuse and addiction.

The mission of the NINDS is to seek fundamental knowledge about the brain and nervous system and to use that knowledge to reduce the burden of neurological disease.

About the National Institutes of Health (NIH): NIH, the nation’s medical research agency, includes 27 Institutes and Centers and is a component of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. NIH is the primary federal agency conducting and supporting basic, clinical, and translational medical research, and is investigating the causes, treatments, and cures for both common and rare diseases. For more information about NIH and its programs, visit http://www.nih.gov.

NIH…Turning Discovery Into Health®

  8 comments for “PAIN, NARCOTICS AND CHRONIC ILLNESSES

  1. January 15, 2015 at 6:48 pm

    Patty have you ever considered starting an organization, perhaps in memory of Alex, to address your concerns?

    Thanks for sharing this info!

    Diana xo

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 16, 2015 at 3:15 am

      Yes Diana, I have been thinking about a non profit organization to bring this important issue. I just don’t know where to start. Any ideas? Thank you for your support.

      Like

      • January 16, 2015 at 4:51 am

        Patty, try to connect with like-minded people who are as passionate about this issue as you are and start the conversation – see where it takes you. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • January 16, 2015 at 5:06 am

        Thank you Diana. I am really going to try. Thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. January 18, 2015 at 11:05 pm

    I subscribe that idea too, Patty! We’d all support you 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • January 19, 2015 at 1:39 am

      Thank you. It means a lot to me. We really need to find some answers.😊

      Like

  3. January 20, 2015 at 6:20 am

    Reblogged this on Art by Rob Goldstein.

    Like

  4. January 20, 2015 at 6:41 am

    Thank you for reading it.

    Like

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